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Job Seekers Are Not Seen By AI - Talent Shortage May Be Caused By AI

#AI recruitment is like Tinder. Convenient, easy, fast, and even entertaining, but not good for the participants.


Did you know that male profiles on dating websites with a master's degree are 90% more likely to be selected than those with a bachelor's degree? So after a while, as the system learns, it won't even show you profiles without a master's.


Does that mean that all men with higher qualifications are better suited than those with a Bachelor's degree? Of course not! It means you have lost a massive chunk of your eligible pool.


The same applies to AI-led #recruitment.


AI-led recruitment has become increasingly popular in the job market as technology advances. Like Tinder, it offers convenience, ease, and speed in hiring. However, despite its benefits, AI recruitment may not be as beneficial for the participants as it seems.


Let's take a closer look at how AI recruitment works. Just like dating websites, AI recruitment systems rely on algorithms to match job seekers with potential employers. These algorithms are trained on vast amounts of data, including resumes, job descriptions, and other relevant information. They learn from this data and make decisions based on patterns and correlations.

However, just like dating websites, AI recruitment systems can also have biases. For example, studies have shown that male profiles on dating websites with a master's degree are 90% more likely to be selected than those with a bachelor's degree. This means that the system may prioritise candidates with higher qualifications, filtering out those with only a bachelor's degree, regardless of their potential.


This bias in AI recruitment can have serious consequences. It may exclude qualified candidates who do not meet the system's predetermined criteria, resulting in a loss of a massive chunk of the eligible talent pool. This can perpetuate the talent shortage employers often complain about while limiting job opportunities for qualified candidates.


Just like Tinder, AI recruitment can also be misleading. It may prioritise superficial factors such as education, experience, or keywords in resumes rather than the candidates' actual skills, potential, and cultural fit. This can result in hiring decisions that are based on incomplete or biased information, leading to mismatches between employers and employees.


So, what can be done to address this issue? First and foremost, it is essential for employers and job seekers to be aware of the limitations and biases of AI recruitment systems. While they can be convenient and efficient, they are not infallible. Employers should use AI recruitment as a tool, not a substitute for human judgment, and should always be mindful of potential biases in the system.


Job seekers should also proactively showcase their skills, potential, and cultural fit beyond what AI recruitment systems may capture. It's important to tailor resumes and applications to highlight relevant qualifications and experiences that may not be immediately captured by the system. Networking, personal connections, and professional branding can also significantly stand out in a competitive job market.


Furthermore, it is crucial for organisations that develop and use AI recruitment systems to continuously improve and update their algorithms to minimise biases and ensure fairness and inclusivity in the hiring process. This may include regular audits, diverse training data, and ongoing monitoring to detect and address potential biases.


In conclusion, while AI recruitment may offer convenience, ease, and speed in the hiring process, it has limitations and biases. Like Tinder, it may prioritise superficial factors and exclude qualified candidates, leading to mismatches between employers and employees. It is essential for employers, job seekers, and organisations to be aware of these limitations and take proactive steps to ensure fairness and inclusivity in the hiring process. Only then can we create a job market that truly benefits both employers and job seekers alike.



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